How to Fix the Poet

On soundcloud.com there is a mad scientist of a science fiction poet named Bryant O’Hara. His work is genuinely experimental, each recording an opportunity to explore both technology and theme. I’ve mentioned him here before. I hope to post many more of his recordings in years to come.

This weekend he put up Sym-Bionic, a roller coaster ride of pitch shifting dystopia. (I’m giving you a link to the page so you can read along if you like.) It becomes more frightening the deeper he goes. Knowing that, “We have the technology to smile” does not bring a smile to my sagging face.

He wrote the line, “We can rebuild a poet barely alive/into a socially acceptable unit”, which I am momentarily taking as an antidote to a piece I posted a couple weeks ago (a babbling ad lib indicating that “there’s no poet like a dead poet”). It would be nice to think that Bryant was trying to repair my ills, helping me bask in my own ego-centric glory, but I think he has something bigger in mind…what a poet might have to go through to become that socially acceptable unit. After hearing this you might be content as a pariah.

This is my recording:

(In checking my links I find that you’ll be directed to the new SoundCloud interface. If you’re not a soundclouder the main thing you’ll notice is that the comments are cut off at a single line, even though my comment on Bryant’s track went on at length. This might be good for you but for those of us who network on SoundCloud it’s a serious problem. The past two articles posted here, by Mark Goodwin and myself, address the changes to the site.)

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